Gansu Alpine Finewool
Gansu Alpine Finewool
Image source: ConSDABI

German Blackheaded Mutton
German Blackheaded Mutton
Image courtesy of
EAAP-Animal Genetic Bank

German Gray Heath
German Gray Heath
Image courtesy of
EAAP-Animal Genetic Bank

German Merino
German Merino
Image courtesy of
EAAP-Animal Genetic Bank

German Mutton Merino
German Mutton Merino
Image courtesy of
EAAP-Animal Genetic Bank

German Whiteheaded Mutton
German Whiteheaded Mutton
Image courtesy of
EAAP-Animal Genetic Bank

Gotland ewes
Gotland ewes
Image courtesy of Frank De Smedt and
Vlaamse hobbyfokkers van geiten en schapen

Gotland ewe
Gotland ewe
Image Courtesy of
Gotland Sheep in Australia

Greyface Dartmoor

Dartmoor sheep
Images Courtesy of Dartmoor
Sheep Breeders' Association


Dartmoors

Australian Growmark
Australian Growmark

Gulf Coast Native ram

Gulf Coast Native rams
Images courtesty of
Running Moon Farm


Gulf Coast Native ram

Gute sheep
Gute ram
Image courtesy of
EAAP-Animal Genetic Bank

Gute sheep
Gute sheep
Image courtesy of Helena Sundin

Hampshire ewes in the UK
Hampshire ewes in the UK
Image courtesy of Hampshire
Down Sheep Breeders' Association

Hampshire ewe in the U.S.
Hampshire ewe in the U.S.
Image courtesy of South
Dakota State University



Large tail Han
Large tail Han
Image source: ConSDABI

Small Tail Han
Small Tail Han
Image source: ConSDABI

Hebridean ewe
Hebridean ewe (sheared)

Images courtesy of the
The Hebridean Sheep Society


Hebridean ewe in full fleece
Hebridean ewe in full fleece

Heidschnucke ram
Heidschnucke ram

Images courtesy of Frank De Smedt
and Vlaamse hobbyfokkers van
geiten en schapen

Heidschnucke ewe
Heidschnucke ewe

Herdwick ram
Record-selling Herdwick ram
Image courtesy of the
Mitchell's Auction Company, Ltd.


Herdwick ewe and lamb
Herdwick ewe and lamb
Image courtesy of Sheep of Cumbria

Hill Radnor ewe and lambs
Hill Radnor sheep
Image courtesy of sheepkeeper33

Hog Island ram
Hog Island ram
Image courtesy of the
Accokeek Foundation

Hog Island sheep
Hog Island Sheep
Image courtesy of Walnut Hill Farm


Hu ram
Hu ram
Image source: ConSDABI

Icelandic ewe
Icelandic ewe

Images courtesy of Lavender Farm

Icelandic Leadersheep
Icelandic Leadersheep

Ile de Franch rams
Ile de France rams

Images courtesy of Ile de France Sheep Breeders' Society of South Africa

Ile de France ewe with triplets
Ile de France ewe

Imroz ewe
Imroz ewe
Image courtesy of
EAAP-Animal Genetic Bank

INRA 401 sheep
INRA 401 sheep
Image source: Upra Ovine INRA 401

 


    Sheep Breeds G - I

  • Gansu Alpine Finewool

    The Gansu Alpine Finewool was one of a number of finewool breeds in China which made use of Xinjiang Finewool, along with Russian Merino rams in its development. The Gansu Alpine Finewool was initially based on Mongolian and Tibetan ewes and was developed through backcrossing to Merino type, followed by selection.

    The breed was developed in the Huangchen District of Gansu Province, China, which has an altitude of 2,600 to 4,000 m (8,530-13,123 ft), an annual mean temperature of 0 to 3.8°C (32-39°F), an annual precipitation of 257 to 461 mm, and an average humidity of 35 to 58 percent. The sheep are well adapted to this particular ecological condition. The average weight of grease fleece in ewes is about 4.6 kg (10.1 lbs), and the wool quality is 60-64's (20-25µm).

    Breed categories: fine-wool

    Distribution: China



    German Blackheaded Mutton
    (Schwarzköpfiges Fleischschaf)

  • In 1850, blackheaded meat breeds, such as Leicester, Southdown, and Hampshire were imported from England into Saxony to be crossed with local breeds. Thirty years later, breeding of these sheep started more in Westfalia and Eastern Prussia than in Saxony. The Merinofleischschaf (Merino mutton sheep) was prevalent in Saxony.

    Westfalia, with its high precipitation was the perfect area for the Schwarzkopf Fleischschaf, and it is still the main breeding area. German Blackheaded mutton sheep are medium-sized, white sheep that are wide and long with dark-brown to black head, ears, and legs. They grow crossbred wool with a tight and firm staple that protects them in a wet climate.

    Breed category: meat, medium wool

    Distribution: Europe




  • German Gray Heath
    (Graue gehörnte Heidschnucke)

    The German Gray Heath is the symbol of the Lueneburger Heide in Germany. Their ancestors, the Mouflon were at home in Corsica. Single lambs are born in spring with a curly, black fleece. After the sheep’s first yearly shearing, its wool turns silver gray with a black bib. Head and legs are black and free of wool. Rams weigh up to 80 kg (176 lbs) and have imposing horns that curl close to the face. Ewes weigh about 45 kg (100 lbs) and have short horns.

    Their meat tastes like venison. The dual-coated fleece of a ewe weighs 2.2 kg (4.4 lbs.), of a ram 4 kg (8.8 lbs).. The coarse, straight outer coat is 25 cm (11.4 in.) long. The downy underwool grows 6 cm (2.7 in) long and has a fiber diameter of 25-30 microns. The wool used to be sent to Belgium and Turkey to be worked into carpets.

    Breed category: landrace, rare, double-coated

    Distribution: Germany


    Go to Gesellschaft zur Erhaltung alter und gefährdeter Haustierrassen e.V. (GEH) =>




  • German Merino
    (Merinolandschaf)

    In the 18th century, Southern German Landsheep were crossed with French and Spanish Merinos, which produced the Merinolandschaf. This sheep breed is the most wide-spread one in Germany today, with 40% of the total German sheep population. The Merinolandschaf of today started with the dual- coated Zaupelschaf, which already in 1539 was not liked because it produced inferior wool. For that reason it was crossed with the Marschschaf from the Lower Rhine.

    This sheep was large, prolific, and could march, and its wool had a fiber diameter of 33 to 36 microns. Later, Merino wool sheep from Spain and France were used to improve the wool quality. The Merinolandschaf has a large frame, a straight head with a small woolly tuft on top, no horns, and rough, large ears that stick out to the side, with legs free of wool. It is in no way a landrace, but a highly adaptable breed.

    Breed category: fine-wool

    Distribution: Europe




    German Mutton Merino
    (Merinofleischschaf)

  • There are three German Merino breeds: Merinolandschaf (Merino landsheep), Merinofleischschaf (Merino mutton sheep), and Merinolangwollschaf (Merino longwool sheep). Although all three breeds produce Merino wool and are similar in meat yield, they went through a different historical and genealogical development. The Merinofleischschaf is at home east of the Elbe river, spreading all the way to the Ural Mountains.

    It is suited for intense production in arid or in agricultural areas. It is highly resistant and easily adapts to any climate and keeping conditions. It grows easily with good meat yield. Non- seasonal breeding cycle (3 breedings in 2 years), high fecundity, and good mothering instincts make the Merinofleischschaf a good choice for intense milk-lamb production.

    Breed category: dual-purpose

    Distribution: Europe



     

  • German Whiteheaded Mutton
    (Weißköpfiges Fleischschaf)

    This breed was developed along the North Sea coast in the middle of the last century. English Leicester, Cotswold, Hampshire, and Oxfordshire were imported and crossbred with the local Wilstermarschschaf, a northern German marsh sheep. Breeders succeeded in retaining the wanted qualities of the marsh sheep, such as high fecundity, fast development, and large size. In the 1930’s, a new breed, the Deutsches Weißköpfiges Fleischschaf started to roam the grassy areas next to the North Sea.

    It is the perfect breed to withstand the rough, damp sea climate and suited for life on the dikes. The sheep fatten on the lush dike grass, pound down the earth and encourage new grass growth, thus helping to stabilize the North Sea dikes which makes them resistant against storm floods. The sheep need to be rugged and to protect them against the weather, they have a long, rough fleece with a fiber diameter of 37 to 41 microns. The white wool, also known as Eider wool, has a good crimp which is unusual for such rough wool.

    Breed category: dual-purpose

    Distribution: Europe




  • Gotland
    (Gotland Pelt Sheep, Swedish Fur/Pelt, Pälsfår)

    Gotland sheep were first established on the large Baltic island of Gotland, off the east coast of Sweden. The Vikings brought Karakul and Romanov sheep back from Russia and crossed them with native landrace sheep, such as the Gute. Gotlands are polled. They have short, hair-tipped tails and do not require crutching.

    Lambs are born black and grow quickly, many turning to grey as they mature. Gotlands produce a quick growing, lustrous, colored, curly fleece of medium micron. The Gotland is found throughout Sweden where it is kept for its pelt and meat production. The breed was recently established in the United States via artificial insemination.

    Breed categories: fur, primitive

    Distribution: Europe, United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, North America


    Go to American Gotland Sheep Society =>
    Go to Gotland Sheep Breeders Association of North America =>
    Go to British Gotland Sheep Society =>



     

  • Greyface Dartmoor
    (Dartmoor)

    The Greyface Dartmoor is also known as the Dartmoor or "Improved" Dartmoor. Descended from the local breeds, which grazed the low ground in and around Dartmoor, they have immense strength of constitution developed through withstanding the severe winters and exposed conditions, which exist around the Moor. Improvements were carried out during the 19th century using the local Longwools (Notts) and the Leicester.

    The Dartmoor fleece is classified as Lustre Longwool. They are a medium sized sheep (approx. 60 kg/132 lbs), hornless, deep bodied, short legged, with well woolled head and legs. The white face should be mottled or spotted with black or grey with matching feet.

    Breed categories: long wool

    Distribution: United Kingdom


    Go to Dartmoor Sheep Breeders' Association =>




     

  • Growmark

    Development of the Gromark began in 1965 in northern New South Wales, Australia. The Gromark is fixed at approximately 50 percent Corriedale and 50 percent Border Leicester. It is a dual-purpose sheep which evolved from objective selection for high growth rate and fertility with final selection being based on visual criteria: wool quality, frame, and carcass attributes.

    The Gromark is a large-framed breed (ewes average 80 kg/175 lb) producing large lean lambs and good fleeces with wool fiber diameter being about 30 microns. Breed categories: dual-purpose

    Breed categories: dual-purpose

    Distribution: Australia




  • Guirra  [NOT PICTURED]
    (Levant Red, Sudat)

    The Guirra is found near the Mediterranean coast in the Spanish provinces of Alicante, Valencia, and Castellón de la Plana. The early history of the breed is not known, but according to some authors, the Guirra developed from crossings of the Manchega with thin-tailed North African breeds brought to the Mediterranean coast

    Except for about 5 percent which are black, the color of their medium-fine fleece varies from reddish-brown to yellow-white. Sheep with white coats are not considered pure. The coat color of newborn lambs is a rich, reddish brown, which gradually lightens, becoming at full maturity, a dirty-cream color. Guirra means "reddish" in the Valencian dialect. Sudat means greasy, in reference to the oily condition of the uncleaned wool.

    Guirra sheep are raised almost entirely for meat. The main market is for "cordero pascual," Eastern lamb butchered at 2 to 3 months of age.


    Breed categories: meat, endangered

    Distribution: Spain


    Go to Asociación Nacional Criadores Raza Guirra =>






  • Gulf Coast Native
    (Florida Native, Louisiana Native)

    Spanish sheep first arrived in Florida in the 1500's. Later importations of Spanish and other breeds of sheep mixed with the earlier population, all evolving under the strong natural selection of the native range conditions of Florida and the other Gulf Coast states. Today a remnant of this population survives and is known as the Gulf Coast.

    Gulf Coasts are best known for their resistance to internal parasites. The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station in Gainesville has a flock which has been maintained without the use of anthelmintics since 1962. The Gulf Coast Native is classified as a "critical" breed by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

    Breed categories: medium wool, meat

    Distribution: United States


    Go to Gulf Coast Sheep Breeders Association =>





  • Gute
    (Gutefår)

    Gute sheep are the most primitive breed in the collection of breeds that make up the Swedish Landrace breed group. These breeds belong to the North European Short Tailed Breeds and are related to such breeds as the Finnsheep, Romanov, Spelsau, Shetland, Faroe, Orkney, and Icelandic sheep.

    Both rams and ewes have two well-developed, slightly turned, converging or diverging, symmetrical horns which are strongly curved and deeply ringed. The rams' horns are large and strong; the ewes' are thinner. Gute wool is coarse and may be straight or wavy. It is a mixture of fine wool, long coarser hair, and kemp fibers. Most sheep shed their fleece partly or entirely in the beginning of the summer.

    Breed categories: Swedish landrace, primitive, short-tail, coarse wool

    Distribution: Europe


    Go to Gute Sheep Society of Sweden =>



     

  • Hampshire
    (Hampshire Down)

    The Hampshire sheep acquired its name from the agricultural county of Hampshire in southern England where it was developed from Old Hampshire, Southdown, Wiltshire Horn, and Berkshire Knot crosses. Hampshires were first brought to the United States in 1860, but all of the flocks were either destroyed or scattered during the Civil War.

    Importations in large numbers did not resume until the 1880's. Hampshires are a large breed, with black faces and legs and wool on the legs and head. Their fast growth rate and superior carcass merit make them a popular choice to sire crossbred market lambs.


    Breed categories: meat, medium wool, down

    Distribution: Worldwide


    Go to American Hampshire Sheep Association =>
    Go to Hampshire Down Sheep Breeders Association UK =>




  • Han
    (Large-tail and Small-tail)

    The Han is a type of Mongolian sheep. It was developed in the semi-humid agricultural areas of China (Henan, Hebei, Shandong, Anhui and Jiangsu Provinces). There are two types of Han which in 1982, were claimed as two different breeds: Large-tail Han and Small-tail Han. The Large-tail Han are polled and are characterized by a long, broad, fat tail, with a thin twisted end turing upwards between two lobes, and broadest at the base. Maximum weight being 25 kg.

    Since the tail is too heavy for the sheep to move around easily during grazing, this type (or breed) is only adaptable to the plains. Han sheep are precocious and highly prolific, their fecundity levels being 163% for the Large-tail Han and 229% for the Small-tail Han. Recent reports have given even even higher figures of 192 percent for the Large-tail Han and 270 percent for the Small-tail.

    Breed categories: fat-tail

    Distribution: China




  • Hebridean

    The Hebridean, a sheep breed now classified as rare, originated in the islands off the western coast of Scotland. They are classified as one of the Northern Short-tailed breeds. Over the centuries, Hebridean ewes have been selected by natural systems for hardiness in all weathers, ease of lambing, milkiness and good mothering instincts.

    Because Hebrideans have not been modified by artificial selection they remain a small, economically efficient breeding ewe with a surprising ability to produce quality cross-bred lambs. Both sexes are usually horned with either two or four horns, four horns being the most common. They have shown a greater tendency to browse than other sheep breeds which has made them useful in ecological projects where the control of brush and weeds was needed.

    Breed categories: Rare, Northern European short-tail

    Distribution: United Kingdom


    Go to The Herbridean Sheep Society =>




  • Heidschnucke
    (Lunebergs heideschaap)

    The Heidschnucke are a fairly small sheep, initially originating from Niedersachsen in Germany. There are several varieties of Heidschnucke sheep: the grey horned Heidschnucke, the white horned Heidschnucke, and the moorschnucke (marsh sheep). At one time, the Heidschnucke were the most important sheep in northern Germany, but their numbers have declined substantially.

    Lambs are black at birth, but their fleece discolors their first year of life, until it gets its characteristic grey color. Both rams and ewes have beautiful horns. Lambing percentage is usually low, only about 100 percent.

    Breed categories: rare, primitive

    Distribution: Europe




  • Herdwick

    They name Herwick is derived from an old Norse word that means sheep pasture. It is believed that the ancestors of Herdwick sheep were introduced by early Norse settlers. Herdwick sheep are considered the most hardy of British hill sheep. They are raised mostly in the central and western dales of the Lake District and are noted for their foraging ability in rough terrain. They produce a good crossbred lamb, but their wool is considered to be of low quality and low value. The produce a coarse, grey wool, a carpet wool.

    Breed categories: rare, heritage

    Distribution: United Kingdom


    Go to Herdwick Sheep Breeders' Association =>




    Hill Radnor

    The Hill Radnor is a hardy hill sheep with a long history attached to the central marshes of Wales. The Hill Radnor has a light brown face and legs, free from wool. The rams are horned, with horns of varying size; ewes are naturally polled. Compared to some other hill breeds, the fleece is white and dense, with a fine staple, and is popular with local hand-spinners and weavers. Like many hill breeds they are thrifty and good foragers

    Breed categories hill, medium wool, rare

  • Distribution: United Kingdom


    Go to Hill Radnor Flock Book Society =>




  • Hog Island

    About 200 years ago, a flock of sheep was established on Hog Island, one of Virginia's barrier islands located off its Eastern Shore. The sheep were already native to the area and are believed to have had a substantial amount of Merino blood in them. There were occasional subsequent introductions to the population, the last being in 1953, when a Hampshire ram was taken to the island. In 1974, the island was sold to The Nature Conservancy, which decided to remove all the sheep and cattle.

    Gunston Hall Plantation in Fairfax County, Virginia, eventually became the owner of the greater number of these sheep and exhibited them as part of their replication of 18th century plantation life. Hog Island sheep evolved and survived for over 200 years in an extremely harsh environment on a limited diet and no medical attention.

    It is estimated that there are approximately 200 Hog Island breeding ewes, mostly in Virginia.

    Breed categories: medium wool, rare, heritage

    Distribution: United States


    Go to Hog Island Sheep Breeders Association =>





  • Hu

    Hu sheep originated from Mongolian sheep. They are distributed in the Zhejiang Jiangsu provinces of China and the suburbs of Shanghai. Hu sheep are well recognized for their beautiful wavy lambskins, early sexual maturity, aseasonal breeding, prolificacy, and the adaptability to a hot and humid climate. Hu sheep are raised indoors all year round. The lambskins taken from lambs slaughtered within the day of birth have distinctive wave-like stripes which are still retained after processing.

    Hu sheep lambskins are traditional export item of Zhejiang and Jiangsu provinces. The first estruses in ewes occur at the age of 4-5 months. Rams are capable of mating at the age of 4 months. Ewes cycle all year round. The average ovulation rate is 2.38 with higher ovulation rate of 2.60 in autumn and lower rate of 2.2 in spring. Under normal conditions, ewes lamb twice a year with litter size 2-3 lambs in most cases, and 7-8 lambs occasionally.

    Breed categories: fur, meat

    Distribution: China



     

  • Icelandic

    The modern Icelandic Sheep is a direct descendant of the sheep brought to Iceland by the early Viking settlers in the ninth and tenth century. They are of the North European Short Tailed type, related to such breeds as the Finnsheep, Romanov, and Shetland. A major gene controlling prolificacy has been identified in the Icelandic breed. This gene exhibits action similar to the gene found in the Booroola Merino.

    The fleece from Icelandic sheep has an inner and outer coat typical of the more primitive breeds, and it is the wool for which Iceland is known. It is illegal to import any sheep into Iceland.

    Breed categories: double-coated, short-tailed

    Distribution: North America, Iceland, United Kingdom


    Go to Icelandic Sheep Breeders of America =>
    Read about Icelandic Leadersheep =>
    Go to South Iceland Sheep Breeding Centre (SOUTHRAM) =>



  • Ile de France

    The Ile de France is the result of crossing the English Leicester and the Rambouillet. The breed was originally known as the Dishley Merino. The breed is widespread in France and was introduced to Great Britain in the 1970's. The breed is wide and thick set. Both sexes are polled. The Ile de France is widely used throughout the world as a terminal sire for quality lamb production.

    Breed categories: meat, medium wool

    Distribution: Worldwide


    Go to the French Ile de France Society =>
    Go to Associação Brasileira do Ile de France =>
    Go to Ile de France Sheep Breeders' Society of South Africa =>




  • Imroz
    (Gökçeada)

    The Imrov is among the smallest sheep breeds in Turkey. They are raised for meat, milk, and wool. Animals are predominantly white, with black marks around the mouth, nose and eyes, on the ears and rarely on the tip of the legs. The tail is thin and long, usually reaching below the hocks. Rams have strong spiral horns extending sideways; ewes are usually polled, but up to 30% of the ewes may have small scurs. The head is narrow and its profile is straight. The wool is very coarse and long, and it covers the top of the head

    Breed categories: dual-purpose, carpet wool

    Distribution: Turkey




  • INRA 401

    The creation of the INRA 401 sheep bloodline began in France in 1970, after a series of experiments crossing the Berrichon du Cher x Romanov which began in 1963 with the Romanov breed. Matings were carried out for several successive generations, between breeding stock of the same generation chosen in priority to maintain the origins represented in the foundation generation. The INRA 401 is a highly productive ewe, with a 200 percent prolificacy, excellent out-of-season fertility, good milk production, and outstanding mothering ability.

    Breed categories: meat, medium wool

    Distribution: Europe, United Kingdom


    Go to Upra Ovine INRA 401 La Romane =>

    Go to the British INRA 401 Sheep Society =>




Last updated 21-Jul-2010
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