Rabo Largo sheep
Rabo Largo sheep

Racka sheep
Racka ewes
Image courtesy of Frank De Smedt and
Vlaamse hobbyfokkers van geiten en schapen


Racka sheep
Racka sheep
Image courtesy of
EAAP-Animal Genetic Bank

Rahmani sheep
Rahmani sheep

Rambouillet ram
Polled Rambouillet ram

Rambouillet ewes
Rambouillet ewes

Red Engadine
Red Engadine ram
Image courtesy of
EAAP-Animal Genetic Bank

Red Masai sheep
Red Masai sheep
Image source: IAEA.org

Rhoen sheep
Rhoen sheep
Image courtesy of Ben Visbeek

Rideau sheep
Rideau sheep

Images courtesy of Breezy Ridge Farm


Rideau lamb

Romanov ewes in Belgium
Romanov ewes in Belgium
Image courtesy of Lieven Caekebeke

Romanov ram
Romanov ram in Mexico

California Variegated Mutant
California Variegated Mutant
Image courtesy of Yellow Creek Cottage

American Romney
American Romney

UK Romney
UK Romney
Image courtesy of
EAAP-Animal Genetic Bank

Rouge de l'Ouest ram
Rouge de l'Ouest ram

Images courtesy of Rouge
de l'Ouest fokker Fam. van Amersfoort

Rouge de l'Ouest ewe
Rouge de l'Ouest ewe

Rough Fell
Rough Fell
Image courtesy of
The Sheep Breeds of Cumbria

Roussin lamb
Roussin lamb

Roussin lamb
Roussin lamb
Image courtesy of Hatherleigh

Royal White ewe and lamb
Royal White® ewe and lamb

Image Source: Royal White® Sheep Association

Royal White rams
Royal White® rams

Ryeland sheep
Ryeland ewes

Images courtesy of The Eden Flock

Ryeland lambs
Ryeland lambs

 

    Sheep Breeds R

  • Rabo Largo
    Rabo Largo, meaning broad tail, are found in northeastern Brazil. They originated from fat-tailed hair breeds which were brought from Africa and crossed with the native Crioulo. They are white, pied, or white, with a colored head. Both sexes are horned. Individuals within the breed vary between hair and carpet wool. The breed is one of the long fat-tailed breeds.

    Breed category: hair (meat)

    Distribution: South America


    Go to Associação Brasileira de Criadores de Ovinos =>






  • Racka
    (Zackel)

    The Racka is a unique breed with both ewes and rams possessing long spiral shaped horns. The breed is of the Zackel type and originated in Hungary. The breed is used for milk, wool and meat production. Mature males may have horns as long as two feet or more. The minimum standard length is given as 50 cm (20 inches) for rams and 30 cm (12-15 inches) for ewes.

    The cork-screw horns protrude almost straight upward from the top of the head. The Racka has been described as a hardy animal and is often used in crossbreeding due to its ability to pass this survivability to its offspring. The breeds unique appearance and quiet disposition would make it a desirable animal for hobby situations.

    Breed category: long wool, dual-purpose

    Distribution: Europe






  • Rahmani

    The Rahmani originated in northern Syria and northern Turkey and was introduced into Egypt in the 9th century. The original stock is the Red Karman from Turkey. The breed is named after Rahmania, a village in the Beheira Governorate in the North of the Delta. This breed is believed to have some resistance to internal parasites. The animals breed all year round. The twinning rate is relatively high. They are the largest of the Egyptian sheep breeds. They produce coarse/carpet wool and have a fat-tail. Their color is brown, which fades with age.

    Breed category: fat-tailed

    Distribution: Middle East






  • Rambouillet

    The Rambouillet is the "backbone" of the American Sheep Industry, forming the foundation of most western range flocks and raised throughout the United States. The Rambouillet descends entirely from the Spanish Merino. In fact, it is the French version of the Merino developed when Louis XVI imported 386 Spanish Merinos in 1786 for his estate at Rambouillet.

    Though named for the town in France, the breed owes much of its development to Germany and the United States. The Rambouillet is a dual purpose sheep, producing a desirable carcass and good fine wool. Rambouillets are large sized, rugged and long-lived with a strong flocking instinct. Rambouillet ewes possess many desirable traits which have resulted in their inclusion in crossbreeding programs to improve lamb production.

    Breed category: fine wool, dual-purpose

    Distribution: North America, Europe


    Go to The American Rambouillet Sheep Breeders Association =>
    Go to the Greater Wisconsin Rambouillet Association =>







  • Red Engadine
    (Fuchsfarbene Engadiner)

    Red Engadine sheep orginated in Switzerland in Lower Engadin and in the bordering Tirolian and Bavarian valleys. They originate from local varieties, from the Stone Sheep and the Bergamask sheep. They are medium to large framed and are distinguished by their ram nose and their long, hanging ears.

    They have a dark-brown body and a red-brown, medium to coarse wool which with increasing age becomes lighter. They are an easy-care sheep, well suited to extensive production situations. In the 1980's, the breed was almost extinct in Switzerland, but conservation efforts reversed the trend and in 1992, the Swiss Engadine Sheep Breeders Club was formed.

    Breed category: rare

    Distribution: Europe






  • Red Masai

    Red Masai are an East African fat-tailed type of hair sheep used for meat production. They are found in northern Tanzania, south central Kenya, and Uganda. Masai are red-brown, occasionally pied. Males are horned or polled. Females are usually polled. Red Masai are known for being resistant to internal parasites.

    Breed category: hair (meat), fat-tailed

    Distribution: Africa, Europe







  • Rhoen
    (Rhöenschaf, Rhönschaf, Rhön)

    One of the oldest landraces in Germany was mentioned in 1844 in the files of the convent of Fulda: “The common sheep of the Rhoen farmer is a normal German sheep with peculiar characteristics, which even in foreign countries is known as Rhöenschaf. It is yellow-white with a black hornless head and is clothed in coarse, non-elastic wool, with little crimp. Its body is large, the bones are strong, and it lends itself to fattening.”

    Pictures from 1873 show that the Rhöenschaf then was similar to the one of today, despite crossbreeding attempts with Cotswold, Oxfordshire, and Merino rams. Even today it is a medium to large-sized sheep with long legs and no horns. It is the only breed with white legs and black head that is free of wool.

    This extremely hardy and frugal landrace is well suited for the wet climates of rough highlands, where it is useful in landscape preservation. In the higher regions, the sheep feed on rough grasses and tree sprouts; in lower areas, they groom the meadows that are dotted with fruit trees.

    Breed category: meat

    Distribution: Africa, Europe


    Go to Sächsische Schaf- und Ziegenzuchtverband e.V. =>






  • Rideau

    Rideau sheep are one of three Canadian breeds. Their development began in 1968 at Agriculture Canada's Animal Research Centre in Ottawa when the Centre's Suffolk, Shropshire, and Dorset sheep were combined with imported breeds: Finnish Landrace and East Friesian. In 1974, the Rideau was closed to the introduction of new genetic material.

    From 1974 to 1977, the numbers within the breed were multipled with minimal culling to broaden the genetic base. From 1977 to 1986, selection emphasis was on high fertility and the potential for yearround lambing and to a lesser extent retail cut yield. In 1988 and 1989, the breed was released to nucleus flockowners.

    Since 1989, the breed's popularity has grown rapidly. Rideau sheep should be used in commercial flocks to improve the maternal traits within that flock. Approximately 50% of Rideau ewes carry three lambs or more during pregnancy and another 40% carry twins.

    Breed category: meat, prolific

    Distribution: North America


    Go to Rideau Association of Canada =>





  • Romanov

    The Romanov sheep breed originated in the Volga Valley, northeast of Moscow. The name “Romanov” comes from the old royal family of Russia. These sheep were first noticed in the 18th century, and were later imported into Germany and then France. In 1980, the Canadian government brought in 14 Romanov ewes and 4 rams for testing and put them into quarantine for 5 years. After that, some were brought to the United States

    Romanov ewes tend to lamb by the litter. Most other sheep give birth to singles and twins, while the Romanov average about 2-5 lambs per lambing. When the lambs are born they are pure black but when they get older they turn gray. Romanov wool (a mixture of gray wool and black guard hair) is used for rugs, mats, and wall hangings.

    Breed category: meat, prolific, short-tailed

    Distribution: Worldwide




  • Romeldale/California Variegated Mutant (CVM)
    (American Romeldale)

    The Romeldale is a breed of sheep developed by A.T. Spencer, who felt the Romney breed would increase the staple, length, and carcass quality of his Rambouillets. Through many years of selection, the Romeldale breed was developed, with fleece properties of 60-64's, extremely high yield, and uniformity including carcass cutability superior to the other whiteface breeds. During the 1960's, Glen Eidman, a partner of J.K. Sexton, found in his purebred Romeldale flock a multi-colored ewe lamb.

    Two years later a ram lamb of the same barred pattern was born and when crossed with the ewe, the resulting offspring were of the same color pattern. Through subsequent breeding and further mutants from the Romeldale flock, the C.V.M. Breed was born. These sheep, christened C.V.M.'s or California Variegated Mutants, were kept by Eidman who then placed emphasis on spinability of the fleece, twinning, and lambing ease. The CVM is classified as a "critical" breed by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

    Breed categories: medium wool, rare

    Distribution: United States


    Go to American Romeldale/CVM Association ==>

    Go to Calfornia Variegated Mutant: A Rare American Original=>




  • Romney

    The Romney is truly a versatile breed, as demonstrated by its ability to produce quality meat and wool under diverse climate conditions and management systems. It is so-named for the Romney Marsh region in Kent, England where it was developed as a dual purpose sheep. Due to the extreme geographic and climatic conditions of the region, Romney sheep developed some specific breed characteristics which include hooves which are resistant to footrot and fleeces which remain heavy in harsh weather.

    Due to similar land topography, Romneys made an easy transition to the Southern Island of New Zealand and the Falkland Islands where they quickly established themselves as the most predominant breed. The first Romneys came to the United States in 1904. Their long, lustrous fleeces are sought by hand spinners.

    Breed category: long wool, dual-purpose

    Distribution: Worldwide


    Go to the American Romney Breeders Association =>
    Go to Romney Sheep Breeders Society =>
    Go to the New Zealand Romney Breeders' Association =>






  • Rouge de l'Ouest

    The Rouge is a medium sized breed of excellent conformation without excessive bone. As its name suggests, its head, which is hornless, can vary from pink to deep red and is covered with fine hair. The breed is strong and deep through the chest with good length in back and loin, but it is the exceptional hind quarters and muscling that are immediately recognized as the powerhouse of the Rouge.

    The Rouge de l'Ouest is of the same origin as the Bleu du Maine, but with a distinctive pink face and legs. It is used primarily for market lamb production, though was originally kept as a dairy sheep to produce Camembert cheese. However; French breeders concentrated on breeding their animals for superior conformation, whilst retaining prolificacy and milkiness. The name Rouge de l'Ouest (usually shorted to Rouge) translates as Red of the West, describing both the color and origin of the breed.

    Breed category: meat, medium wool

    Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe


    Go the British Rouge Sheep Society =>






  • Rough Fell

    The Rough Fell is an exceptionally docile sheep that excels in hardiness and has no equal in its power to exist under adverse conditions. It is well fitted to endure the hardships of the mountains and valleys of Northern England including the Lake District and the Yorkshire Dales. Drafted to lower ground, the Rough Fell is a dual purpose breed and is found in many counties of the United Kingdom. They are ideal for crossing. The breed has a horned black head with a definite white patch on the nose.

    Breed category: carpet wool

    Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe


    Go to The Rough Fell Sheep Breeders' Association =>






  • Roussin
    (Roussin de la Hague)

    Roussin Sheep were developed from, the Brittany Heath Sheep. Dishley Leicester and the Southdown. In the 1960's the breed was improved using Suffolk and Avranchin. In 1977, the breed was closed and the characteristics established. The main areas in France the Roussin are the Cherbourg peninsular, Normandy, and Brittany. The French sheep breeds tend to stay in their local areas. However Roussin Rams have been taken down to the Carmangue to be used on the feral sheep to produce fat lambs off the salt marsh.

    Roussin sheep are now found throughout Europe and the UK, able to adapt to any soil or climatic conditions. Roussin are hardy and prolific, capable of achieving with 200% lambing average. Ewes have plenty of milk and lamb growth rates are averaging 340 grams (0.75 lbs.) per day upto 100 days. Lambs finish at 18 to 21 kg (40-46 lbs.) dead weight. The carcasses are noted for their exceptional meat to bone ratio.

    Breed category: carpet wool

    Distribution: United Kingdom, Europe


    Go to the Roussin Sheep Society =>




  • Royal White®

    The Royal White® is a new breed of hair sheep privately funded and developed by William Hoag, of Dorpcroix Sheep Farm in Hermeleigh, Texas. The breed is a cross between the Dorper and St. Croix. They are pure white. They grow a longer hair in the winter that is shed off naturally in the spring. Ewes and rams are naturally hornless. Texas Tech and Texas A & M University are currently doing research with the breed with regards to meat production and scrapie resistance.

    Breed category: hair (meat)

    Distribution: United States

    Go to Royal White® Sheep Association =>







  • Ryeland

    Ryelands are a white-faced, polled (no horns), small to medium sized, down-type breed whose antecedents were developed by monks at Leominster in the rye growing district of Herefordshire, England, in the 15th Century. It was one of the breeds used to introduce the poll gene to the Dorset breed in the development of the Poll Dorset. The Ryeland breed first came to New Zealand in 1903 and later to Australia.

    Initially a dual purpose sheep, the breed was, in latter years, used mainly as a terminal sire. There has been a recent upsurge in interest in the Ryeland as a breed ideally suited for small farmers who want the truly all-purpose type of sheep; not too big to handle safely, docile, fertile, thrifty, and capable of providing both fine wool for hand-spinning and high quality meat for the table.

    Breed category: medium wool, meat

    Distribution: United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand


    Go to the Ryeland Flock Book Society =


     


Last updated 24-Apr-2012
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